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The Psalms of Lament in Mark’s Passion

August 27, 2008

For those of you interested in how the NT uses the Psalms I thought I would draw to your attention The Psalms of Lament in Mark’s Passion by Stephen Ahearne-Kroll. It was published in 2007 by Cambridge University Press.

Contents
Acknowledgments
Abbreviations

1 Introduction
1 Scholarly approaches to the study of the use of scripture in the New Testament with special attention to the PssLam
1.1 Major works that include the PssLam
1.2 Ways of studying the New Testament’s use of scripture

2 The methodology of the present study
2.1 Defining the scope
2.2 Author, text, and reader
2.3 The nature and identification of allusions
2.4 Word, verse, context, or text? What to consider in an evocation
2.5 Allusion vs. echo
2.6 The ⅬⅩⅩ text: translated text, translator’s intention, and text reception

3 Structure of this study and summary of the argument

2 Issues in the study of the Psalms of Individual Lament in relationship to the Gospel of Mark
1 Form-critical issues in the PssLam
1.1 Form critics on the PssLam
1.2 The limitations of form criticism of the PssLam
1.3 The relationship between the lament and the praise/thanksgiving in the PssLam

2 David, the PssLam, and the Gospel of Mark
2.1 Davidic authorship of the Psalms
2.2 David, the PssLam, and the Gospels
2.3 David and the Gospel of Mark

3 The evocations of the Psalms of Individual Lament in Mark’s passion narrative
1 Introduction

2 Simple evocations of Psalms of Individual Lament in Mark 14–15 61
2.1 Joel Marcus’ list of allusions to the PssLam in Mark’s passion narrative 61
2.2 The evocation of Ps 40:10 in Mark 14:18
2.3 The evocation of Pss 41:6, 12; 42:5 in Mark 14:34
2.4 The evocation of Ps 68:22 in Mark 15:23
2.5 The evocation of Ps 21:19 in Mark 15:24
2.6 The evocation of Ps 21:8 in Mark 15:29
2.7 The evocation of Ps 21:2 in Mark 15:34
2.8 The evocation of Ps 68:22 in Mark 15:36

3 The use of Psalms 21, 40, 41–2 and 68 in Second Temple Judaism

4 Interpretation of the ⅬⅩⅩ Psalms of Individual Lament evoked in Mark’s passion narrative
1 Introductory remarks about the study of the ⅬⅩⅩ Psalms

2 Rhetorical issues and interpretation of ⅬⅩⅩ Psalms 21, 40, 41–2, and 68
2.1 The superscripts in the Psalms
2.2 Psalm 21
2.3 Psalm 40
2.4 Psalm 41–2
2.5 Psalm 68

3 Conclusion

5 Jesus and David in Mark 10–12
1 Introduction

2 David and the Son of David in Mark 10–12
2.1 Blind Bartimaeus (Mark 10:46–52)
2.2 The triumphal entry (Mark 11:1–25)
2.3 The rejected Davidic Son of God (Mark 12:1–12)
2.4 Jesus not the Son of David? (Mark 12:35–7)

3 Conclusion

6 The Passion
1 Introduction
1.1 The main argument of this chapter
1.2 Typological identification of David and Jesus

2 Ambiguity, suffering and betrayal in the midst of faithful relationship: Psalm 40 in Mark 14:17–21
2.1 Reading Mark 14:17–21 in light of Psalm 40
2.2 Reading Mark 14:17–21 in light of David’s Psalm 40
2.3 Wider effects of Psalm 40 in the sections leading up to Gethsemane

3 Gethsemane: the embodiment of the lamenter
3.1 Reading Mark 14:32–42 without Psalms 40 and 41–2
3.2 Mark 14:32–42 in light of Psalm 41–2: similarities between Jesus and the psalmist
3.3 Davidic implications

4 The arrest and trial: continued abandonment and fulfilling God’s will to suffer
4.1 The scriptural justification for Jesus’ suffering and death
4.2 David as a model for Jesus’ suffering
4.3 Apocalyptic questions

5 The crucifixion and death of Jesus
5.1 Reading Mark 15:22–39 without Psalms 21 and 68
5.2 Reading Mark 15:22–39 in light of Psalms 21 and 68
6 Conclusion

7 Conclusion
1 Jesus the warrior king?
2 The veil and the centurion
3 The rest of the story
Works Cited
Index

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